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The American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) will honor the world’s top textile scientists next month, March 10-12, during AATCC’s 2009 International Conference (IC) in Myrtle Beach, S.C., USA, at the Hilton Myrtle Beach Resort. The awards will be presented at the association’s Conference Awards Luncheon on Thursday, March 12.

The article published January 2007, “Describing Color Differences," written by Carol Tomasino Revels was selected as the best paper published in AATCC Review in 2007. A report on “Capillary Channel Polymer Fibers as Structural Templates for Ligament Regeneration," written by Philip J. Brown, Kristofer D. Sinclair, and Charles Kenneth (Ken) Webb, and published December 2008, has been selected as the best paper published in the peer reviewed journal of the AATCC Review in 2008.

The authors will be honored for their contributions to textile literature with The J. William Weaver Paper of the Year Award, a framed certificate signed by the president of AATCC and the chair of the Publications Committee. The Weaver award will be presented to both the 2007 and 2008 winners at the AATCC International Conference.

Revels holds a BS in textile chemistry and a Masters degree in Textiles from North Carolina State University. She is currently the director for global color services for Gap, Inc. Revels joined AATCC as a student in 1985. She served as chair of the Color Measurement Test Methods Committee, and is currently chair of the Color Guidebook subcommittee.

Brown holds a BSc Hons in Textile Chemistry and a PhD from the University of Leeds. He is currently an associate professor at the School of Materials Science and Engineering at Clemson University. Brown joined AATCC in 2002. He has served as vice-chair and is the current chair of the Materials Interest Group. He is also a member of the Fiber Society. Brown has published four books and monographs, and 20 peer-reviewed papers.

Webb holds a BS in Agricultural and Biological Engineering from Clemson University and a PhD in Bioengineering from the University of Utah. He is currently an assistant professor at the department of Bioengineering at Clemson University. Webb is a member of the Society for Biomaterials. He has published 18 peer-reviewed papers.

Sinclair holds a BS from the University of South Carolina. He is currently engaged as a graduate student research assistant at Clemson University. Sinclair joined AATCC in 2006, and is also a member of the Society for Biomaterials. He has published two peer-reviewed papers, both in AATCC Review.

In February 1979, the AATCC established an award for the best peer- reviewed paper published annually in the Textile Chemist and Colorist (now AATCC Review). In 1990, the award was named for J. William Weaver (1916-1990), who was chair of the Textile Chemist and Colorist Editorial Board at the time of his death.

American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists

In presenting the NCC’s 2009 Economic Outlook to delegates attending the NCC’s 71st Annual Meeting, Adams said, “For the 2009 marketing year, reductions in cotton production will be evident in more countries than observed in previous years.

Also, mill use is expected to recover based on independent economic projections calling for recovery by calendar 2010.” He reiterated, though, that these projections are dependent on the wildcards of overall global economic performance and impacts of policy changes.

In describing the world outlook for 2009, Adams said world cotton production is projected to fall 4.3 million bales to 105.5 million bales – the smallest crop since 2003. World mill use will recover to 113.8 million bales. The smaller crop and increased mill use would allow stocks to decline to 56.3 million bales from 62.2 million in 2008.

Looking at the 2009 world cotton market, Adams said China and India will continue to be important players. He said both countries governments have made policy decisions that have moved significant amounts of the 2008 crop into government stocks – and how they handle those stocks’ release will affect U.S. exports.

For example, China is estimated to end the 2008 marketing year with 19.4 million bales of stocks, with a significant amount in government reserves.

“If the Chinese government decides to aggressively liquidate those reserves in the coming months, it could dramatically alter their import requirements,” Adams said. He noted that for the 2009 marketing year, a slight recovery in China’s mill cotton use to 47.2 million bales is expected along with a cotton crop decline to 32.6 million bales from 36.5 million in 2008 – which would result in China importing 9.6 million bales in the 2009 marketing year.

On the other hand, he said India may return as a more significant exporter in 2009 as that country’s production is expected to be near current levels with only a slight recovery in mill use.

The economist told delegates the NCC sees a slight contraction in U.S. cotton offtake for 2009 with U.S. cotton exports projected at 11.2 million bales and U.S. mill cotton use at 3.9 million bales.

“Heading in 2009, the U.S. textile industry remains under pressure from a combination of factors,” Adams said. “Retail purchases declined in calendar 2008 and likely will fall further in 2009. In addition, the limits on imports from China in 34 textile categories expired at the end of 2008.”

On a positive note, Adams said the much-needed economic assistance included in the 2008 Farm Bill has been implemented and textile mills are submitting the necessary documentation to receive 4 cents per pound on their cotton consumption.

Also, the United States’ government has begun monitoring certain U.S. textile and apparel imports from China in a move aimed at preventing a repeat of the disruptive surge of Chinese textile/apparel exports to thiscountry following the discontinuation of quotas in 2005.

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